Jazz Hands! (Or how I keep your prints oil-free)

These are my print handling gloves. They’re simple white cotton gloves and they stop any oil from my hands transferring to the prints while I’m handling them.

This post is brought to you through the medium of expressive mime...

These are my print handling gloves. They’re simple white cotton gloves and they stop any oil from my hands transferring to the prints while I’m handling them.

It’s all part of making my work as archival and lasting as possible; give it a few years and your investment still won’t have any sticky paw prints on it.

And yes, once they are donned it is almost impossible to resist doing a fake tap dance and making “jazz hands”! 😂

Do you ever use colour?

A very small pastel painting of bluebells carpeting the ground beneath three copper beech trees sporting their dark red new leaves. In the back ground are flowering shrubs and trees.

‘Bluebells, Coles’
2.5 x 3.5in (ACEO size)
Soft pastel on UArt paper

The weather is cold and grey today but it won’t be long before the bluebells are carpeting the beech woods with wave after floral wave of delicately scented colour.

This is a teeny, tiny pastel painting I did on UArt paper with the most delicious soft pastel set made by Sennelier.

You thought there was no colour in my art, right?! Well, part of the joy of linocutting my way is the challenge of representing a world filled with colour and tone using just one colour and making a variety of marks to suggest tone. When colour is removed the viewer focuses on the textures, shapes and subject matter instead.

The measure of productivity

A black and white photo of a small shallow ceramic dish full of lino cuttings. These are like carrot or potato peelings, but on a much smaller scale since many were made with tools under 1mm across

A day’s productivity pile before /\
.
.
.
... and after \/

A black and white photo of a small shallow ceramic dish that is now emptied and contains no lino cuttings so the rake fired pattern on the inside is now satisfyingly visible

I must confess that I don’t always manage to corral my lino cuttings into a small shallow ceramic dish.

Usually, I’m so focussed on cutting that bits can be found all over the bench (and me... and the floor... several rooms away)!

But stopping to put them into a dish means less mess, and I get to empty it at the end of the day and enjoy the raku fired pattern on the inside of the now satisfyingly empty dish.

Buy me a Ko-fi

A black and white close-up photo of the surface of a mug of hot beverage. On the top, bubbles formed when the hot water was added have collected into a heart shape.

I’ve just got myself a Ko-fi page!

If you haven’t heard of it, Ko-fi helps people who make things get support from the people who like those things.

ko-fi.com/lbprintmaker

If you like my prints and cards, please consider buying me a “coffee” to keep me in ink & paper, although you can set up a campaign, so I am currently working towards getting the ‘Instruments of Hope’ series framed.

Thank you! *raises mug in a toast to lovely followers*

Best Ever Testimonial

Handwritten note from my youngest collector that reads, "Thank you for the lovely otter picter [sic]. It is so adorable I also really [pen colour changes] liked the card it was so funny (I have changed pen) do you like my — [drawing of a cetacean with "whale" written inside it] or dolphin [nineteen X for kisses] Loads of love frome [sic]"

There was a thread over on Twitter about best ever feedback or testimonial.

For me, it has to be this one, which is from my youngest collector who is nine years old and had just received an otter print.

You, too, can own an otter print that I hope will bring you as much joy as it for a budding art collector!